Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend

It's the time of year when we get to watch what is typically the best meteor shower of the year.

The Perseid's occur when Earth travels through the stream of debris that is left over from the comet Swift-Tuttle, but since the meteors appear to come from a point (the radiant)  which lies within the constellation Perseus, it's called the Perseid Meteor Shower. 

The meteors can be seen as early as late July, but they often peak in the middle of August. This year, the Perseid Meteor Shower will peak on Saturday afternoon. However, since meteor showers are unlikely to be seen during the day, they will be visible during the pre-dawn hours of the 11th, 12th, and 13th. 

This year's Perseid Meteor Shower has fallen victim to a false story or rumor that claimed this year's shower would be "the brightest in human history". In fact, the Perseid's will be a little sub-par this year. This years shower will produce 40-50 meteors per hour instead of the 80-100 meteors per hour that typically zip across the sky. This is because the Moon will be three-quarters full and will make the fainter meteors hard to see. 

It looks like the weather will cooperate this year. The forecast calls for mostly clear to partly cloudy skies on Friday and Saturday night with temperatures in the lower 60s and upper 50s. Even though the moon will wash out some of the "shooting stars", the Perseid Meteor Shower is bound to produce a few bright fireballs that will clearly be visible! So head out and enjoy the show!

Here are a few tips when viewing the Perseid Meteor Shower...

  • Watch Between Midnight & Dawn

Most meteor showers are often better after midnight once the earth turns in to the meteor stream.

  • Avoid City Lights and Light Pollution

While a few meteors may be visible when you're surrounded by light's, but you'll see many more meteors in wide open and dark areas. Even the dullest meteors can appear real bright out in the country.

  • Try Watching in the Evening

You won't see many meteors at this time, but you may be lucky enough to catch an Earthgrazer. These are meteors that are visible for long periods of time as they travel horizontally across the sky. If you see one, you forget it!

  • Watch With Friends and Family

Let's face it, everything is better with friends and family!


More Stories

Trending Stories

Don't Miss

  • CIProud Text Alerts
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Meet the Team
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • CI Heroes
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • WMBD on Facebook
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Living Well with Evelyn Wilkerson
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Latest News

Video Center