The Latest: Lightfoot to be Chicago’s 1st black female mayor

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Grammar school students stop to say hello and hug mayoral candidate Lori Lightfoot outside a 14th Ward polling location, Tuesday, April 2, 2019, in Chicago. (Abel Uribe/Chicago Tribune via AP)

CHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the Chicago mayoral election (all times local):

8:10 p.m.

Former Houston Mayor Annise Parker says she is excited and stunned by the magnitude of Lori Lightfoot’s election as Chicago’s first black female and openly gay mayor.

Lightfoot on Tuesday defeated Toni Preckwinkle, a former school teacher who served in the City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president in 2011.

Parker was known to be gay when she became Houston’s mayor in 2010. She says Lightfoot’s victory is a clear repudiation of traditional Chicago politics. She says it will also mean a lot of folks will be expecting great things from Lightfoot. Parker says there “will be a lot of pressure” on the new mayor.

The 56-year-old Lightfoot is a former federal prosecutor who campaigned on ridding Chicago’s government of corruption. She also said she wanted to help low-income and working-class people she believes have been “left behind and ignored” by Chicago’s political ruling class.

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7:45 p.m.

Political newcomer Lori Lightfoot has been elected Chicago mayor, becoming the first black female — and openly gay — leader of the city.

Lightfoot on Tuesday defeated Toni Preckwinkle, a former school teacher who served in the City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president in 2011.

The 56-year-old Lightfoot is a former federal prosecutor who campaigned on ridding Chicago’s government of corruption. She also said she wanted to help low-income and working-class people she believes have been “left behind and ignored” by Chicago’s political ruling class.

Lightfoot and Preckwinkle were the top two vote-getters in the February general election that saw 14 vie to succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel. He decided against running for a third term.

Lightfoot will be sworn in May 20.

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7 p.m.

The polls are closed in Chicago and the counting begins to determine who will be the city’s next mayor.

The winner between former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle will be Chicago’s first black female mayor.

The 56-year-old Lightfoot has never held elected office, which she says fits the times in a city that has seen a scandal-ridden Democratic Party in charge for decades. Lightfoot calls herself “a different kind of Democrat” who wants to end the old ways of doing things.

The 72-year-old Preckwinkle is a former school teacher who served on the Chicago City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president. She also heads the country’s Democratic Party.

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2:15 p.m.

A 64-year-old dog catcher says he voted for former prosecutor Lori Lightfoot in the Chicago mayor’s race because he thought she would be a unifier who would “let everybody in.”

John Allison cast his ballot in the mayoral runoff at a polling station at Douglas Park Baptist Church. Fellow voter Truly Gannon also cast her ballot there, for Lightfoot’s opponent, Tony Preckwinkle.

Gannon is a 39-year-old dietician and mother of four. She said she thinks Preckwinkle “had more experience.”

Either Lightfoot or Preckwinkle will become the city’s first black female mayor and succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who isn’t seeking re-election. They were the two top vote-getters in the city’s 14-person general election in February.

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6:20 a.m.

Polls are open in Chicago where a runoff election is pitting a veteran politician against a former prosecutor in a race that will end with the city’s first black woman in the mayor’s office.

Former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle were the top vote-getters in a 14-person general election in February. On Tuesday, one of the Democrats will succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who didn’t seek re-election.

The 56-year-old Lightfoot has never held elected office, which she says fits the times in a city that has seen a scandal-ridden Democratic Party in charge for decades. The openly gay Lightfoot calls herself “a different kind of Democrat” who wants to end the old ways of doing things.

The 72-year-old Preckwinkle is a former school teacher who served on the Chicago City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president. She also heads the country’s Democratic Party.

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12 a.m.

Chicago will have its first black woman as mayor after voters choose between candidates who waged contentious campaigns that highlighted their contrasting political paths.

Former federal prosecutor Lori Lightfoot and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle were the top vote-getters in a 14-person general election in February to succeed Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who did not seek re-election. They have similar positions on many issues but divergent resumes.

The 56-year-old Lightfoot has never held elected office, which she says fits the times in a city that has seen a scandal-ridden Democratic Party in charge for decades.

The 72-year-old Preckwinkle is a former schoolteacher who served on the Chicago City Council for 19 years before becoming Cook County Board president.

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