Madi McCoy Hits Despite Circulation Condition

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She is the red hot hitter with ice cold hands.

And it’s been that way for Madi McCoy since she was diagnosed with Raynaud’s Disease about four years ago.

“When it gets cold, her hands and feet go numb,” said Illinois Central College softball coach Heather Doty. “When it gets cold, you look at her hands, the palms of her hands are blotchy white and it starts moving to
her fingertips.”

Cold, damp conditions and stress play havoc with small arteries in her body. They cut off blood flow to her fingers.

That’s not great for a softball player in the Midwest.

“We found it’s better to keep (my hands and feet) warm to begin with, then to wait until the last minute,” said McCoy. “Once they’re numb, they are numb for hours.”

McCoy says it started when she was an underclassmen at Washington High School. At halftime of basketball games she’d notice the bottoms of her feet were white from a lack of circulation.

The ICC freshman carries multiple gloves in her equipment bag. One is her first baseman’s glove.

The other  is battery-powered pair gloves that look like those you’d see at a ski lodge. She uses them between innings to keep warm and keep blood flowing to her fingers.

“They call me Kong, because I look like King Kong with them,” McCoy joked. “They look like you’d play
in the snow with them. They get really hot.”

McCoy has been a King Kong with her bat this spring. She leads her team with a .415 average and has slugged 13 homers.

She’s hoping for warm, dry conditions for this week’s Region 24 Tournament, which ICC is hosting at Eastside Centre in East Peoria.

McCoy would rather make a mess out of pitching staffs of her opponents than mess with circulation issues in her fingers and feet.

“When I walk, I can’t feel where I’m walking. I drag my feet,” McCoy said  while recounting episodes when the blood circulation in her feet is poor.

“I look like a hot mess.”

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